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Sunday, March 14, 2010

Sunday Style - September 1801



MORNING DRESS

L. A cream-coloured chip bonnet, with a yellow hankerchief, the flowers and pips of the wreath also yellow. A plain buff muslin gown. A white muslin Spenser, with close collar trimmed with lace, but plain at the wrists. The gloves and shoes yellow.


R. A white hat, turned up before and behind with a blue and white feather and blue satin beads. A plain blue muslin gown: shoes and gloves the same colour. A white muslin cloak, with two rows of lace-trimming on the neck; the rest plain.













AFTERNOON DRESS

L.  A spotted muslin cap, open on the crown; the trimming lace and yellow ribbands. The dress yellow muslin, with an upper robe of white muslin trimmed and laced with black cord on the front and shoulders. the gloves and shoes yellow.

R. A hat of imperial chip, with white and blue feathers. The gown white, with an upper dress of sarcenet trimmed with silver, and open on the left side. A necklace of gold plates. The gloves white, and shoes blue.


BON MOT

A LADY of fashion, very talkative, quite toothless and stricken in hears, though wishing to be thought young, lately asked a wag of the faculty how it could happen that, at her time of life, she should have lost her teeth?
To which the other replied---
"I cannot really tell, my Lady, unless, as may be very well supposed, they have been worn away by your tongue!"


Ouch!! 

Source: The Lady's Monthly Museum, September, 1801.

8 comments:

  1. Pretty pictures :-) What I'm having trouble finding information on is what ladies wore in the way of undergarments. Can you enlighten me? I'm interested in the period of time around the 1820s :-)

    Also, nice blog. I enjoy visiting :-)

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  2. These are great, Heather. I love looking at old fashion plates and getting a better feel for what my characters might have worn.

    What a pain it must have been to have to change clothes so many times in a day, though.

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  3. Sandra, this link will probably help in the undergarments department:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1795%E2%80%931820_in_fashion#Undergarments

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  4. What lovely pictures, Heather! Thanks for posting this.

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  5. I had to laugh at the story at the end. :)

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  6. Sandra,

    I find this a really great resource for clothing images and descriptions. Have fun!

    http://www.songsmyth.com/images.html

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  7. It's hard to imagine needing to change clothes several times a day. Sound like a waste of time to modern ears. I can't help but wonder what the women might have accomplished if they weren't distracted by the need to slavishly follow "the done thing."

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