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Thursday, May 22, 2014

Samantha's Trip to The Big Easy

Last week my husband and I were in New Orleans to attend the RT Convention. I love New Orleans. This was my second trip, and there is just something about the city that just grabs me. In fact my 2006 trip made enough of an impression that the city found its way into two of my books. Lady Amelia's Mess and a Half ends in New Orleans and the next book picks up in the city days later.  

 Miss Lavigne's Little White Lie begins in the French Quarter in the early 1800s. A young Creole woman named Lisette Lavigne, her cousin Serafine, and her 9-year-old brother Rafe are hiding in the family gardens, waiting to flee from Lisette's betrothed in the middle of the night. A few days earlier Lisette overheard her betrothed discussing plans to throw her brother into an asylum after they marry, and she knows the only way to save Rafe is to take him to England where his guardian is living. Sneaking past the two goons her betrothed has stationed outside her home, they make their way to the waterfront to a tavern called The Abyss in search of Captain Daniel Hillary, the man she thinks has agreed to allow them passage on his ship, but that's a whole other complication. 

I think the opening chapter of Miss Lavigne is my favorite opening chapter of any book I've written, because it has a bit of the flavor of New Orleans. I know having written that book made me look at the city through different eyes this time. I stopped to admire the iron work, flora, and the Mississippi river in a way I hadn't quite when I visited the first time. I was very happy with our decision to stay in a bed and breakfast even though it was a distance from the convention hotel, because it allowed me those moments to explore the French Quarter. I took a few photos and thought y'all might like to see some of the scenery. 
My writing spot at the B&B

Look at that iron work & arches

I love the overflowing flower boxes & red door!



Lafitte Blacksmith Bar

 A note about the Lafitte Blacksmith Bar: There is a claim the Pirate Lafitte and his brother used the building between 1772 & 1791, but Lafitte didn't come to Louisiana until 1803. Hmm… Perhaps we have a little fiction going on?

The Mississippi from the 41st floor of the Marriott

How do you feel about Regencies that venture from England? Are there other places you would like your historical heroes and heroines to travel to? 

Because I love the Hillary brothers and I'm working on their older brother's story now, I'll giveaway a copy of either Lady Amelia's Mess and a Half or Miss Lavigne's Little White Lie to a reader who hasn't ever read about the Hillary men.
  






17 comments:

  1. Lovely pictures, Sam!

    I adore Regencies that leave England and am always on the hunt for them. Those Brits got around and it's always fun to see the different places in the world they pop up (and find love).

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    1. They did get around, didn't they, Jennifer? It's fun to think of them traveling the globe, and what fun it would be to research different areas for a change. :)

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  2. I actually like books with unusual settings. Any of the British colonies would be interesting.

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    1. I enjoy unusual settings too, Sandy. I'm especially interested in the Caribbean. :)

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  3. Honestly I'd welcome some new regency locations (or locations that are not as exotic as say China and India).

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    1. On the Lady Scribes FB page you mentioned the States. Do you have a particular place in mind?

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  4. I haven't read these (yet), but the theme of fleeing the evil -WHATEVER- resonates for me. I've been to New Orleans, right after Katrina (they were still searching houses). The resilience of the city was obvious, and admirable. We actually drove down from Baton Rouge, and our meeting hotel was about 2/3 people from New Orleans.

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    1. Patty,
      Our first trip was almost a year after Katrina and they were still rebuilding. It really is a resilient place.

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  5. Samantha, I feel the same way about NOLA. It totally captured my heart. It's so steeped in history and they've maintained so much of their founding culture. Love, love, love it! Beautiful pics!!

    As for Regencies set outside of England...does Scotland count? LOL! I might like to read an American-set novel in that era, but in a big city. I don't know that I've come across any that deal with the debutante society in NY, unless the heroine heads to London from NY to participate in the London Season. lol.

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    1. Thank you, Jerrica! I told my hubby I wouldn't mind renting a place for a couple of months to research. :)

      I think a society story set in NY would be interesting. I would read it!

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  6. don't mind different settings

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  7. I've enjoyed quite a few Regencies that were set somewhere other than England. I think I'd like to see some historical characters spend some time in Greece, that might be fun.

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  8. I've read a few Regencies that were outside of England, but not many. I haven't read either of these books yet and am curious about how these British characters fare in New Orleans.
    sallans d at yahoo dot com

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    1. They are only in New Orleans a brief time, because I know most readers enjoy the familiarity of England. But it was fun to visit a different place. In Miss Lavigne's Little White Lie, they make a stop on a fictional Caribbean island too. I had a chance to satisfy my wanderlust. :)

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  9. Congratulations to SandyG265! Your name was chosen to receive a copy of either Lady Amelia's Mess and a Half or Miss Lavigne's Little White Lie. Just send me an email at samanthagraceauthor.com to tell me which one you want, the format, and where I should send it. :)

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